Getting some shut-eye: Sleep pods are becoming increasingly common at airports

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IN THEORY, overnight air travel should be wonderfully convenient. Instead of booking a hotel for the night and losing a day, travellers simply sleep while they fly. In reality, sleeping on a plane is hard, and at an airport tougher still. The chairs in terminals, nobody’s idea of comfort to begin with, tend to have armrests that make splaying out unfeasible. Even in business-class lounges, travellers contort themselves into impossible shapes to pretend that workspace desks are actually beds.But soon there may be less need for such acrobatics. Sleep pods are coming to more and more airports. Last month, Washington Dulles International put out a call for proposals for a company to provide “a quiet and comfortable place within the airport to sleep, relax, or work while waiting to board a flight”. Mexico City’s airport has just added sleep pods with a space-age design for $30 a night. YotelAir, which offers pods in Amsterdam, London and Paris, is a touch more expensive at $42 for four hours. Dearer still is Minute Suites, which has operations in three American airports with a fourth coming later this year. Its prices start at $32 an hour. NapCity, which is yet to sign its first lease, will charge $45 for the first hour and a slightly lower rate after that.The concept is not new. Japan opened …

Link to article: www.economist.com/blogs/gulliver/2017/09/getting-some-shut-eye?fsrc=rss

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